Glossary of Computer Repair and Installation Terms - Rick Olson - Fixit Wizard, glossary of computer terms.
Glossary of Computer Repair and Installation Terms - Rick Olson - Fixit Wizard, glossary of computer terms.Glossary of Computer Repair and Installation Terms - Rick Olson - Fixit Wizard, glossary of computer terms.Glossary of Computer Repair and Installation Terms - Rick Olson - Fixit Wizard, glossary of computer terms.


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Glossary of Computer Repair and Software Terms

The world of computer repair and software installation can easily become confusing. Here is a glossary of terms to help you decipher the ton of terms you see and hear about computers, software, and the internet.


Glossary of Computer Repair and Software Terms

application & app

An application (often called "app" for short) is simply a program with a GUI. Note that it is different from an applet.

boot

Starting up an OS is booting it. If the computer is already running, it is more often called rebooting.

browser

A browser is a program used to browse the web. S ome common browsers include Netscape, MSIE (Microsoft Internet Explorer), Safar i, Lynx, Mosaic, Amaya, Arena, Chimera, Opera, Cyberdog, HotJava, etc.

bug

A bug is a mistake in the design of something, e specially software. A really severe bug can cause something to crash.

chat

Chatting is like e-mail, only it is done instantaneously and can directly involve multiple people at once. While e-m ail now relies on one more or less standard protocol, chatting still has a coup le competing ones. Of particular note are IRC and Instant Messenger. One step beyond chatting is called MUDding.

click

To press a mouse button. When done twice in rapid succession, it is referred to as a double-click.

cursor

A point of attention on the computer screen, oft en marked with a flashing line or block. Text typed into the computer will usu ally appear at the cursor.

database

A database is a collection of data, typically organized to make common retrievals easy and efficient. Some common database programs include Oracle, Sybase, Postgres, Informix, Filemaker, Adabas, etc .

desktop

A desktop system is a computer designed to sit in one position on a desk somewhere and not move around. Most general purpose computers are desktop systems. Calling a system a desktop implies nothing a bout its platform. The fastest desktop system at any given time is typically eit her an Alpha or PowerPC based system, but the SPARC and PA-RISC based systems a re also often in the running. Industrial strength desktops are typically called workstations.

directory

Also called "folder", a directory is a collection of files typically created for organizational purposes. Note tha t a directory is itself a file, so a directory can generally contain other directories. It differs in this way from a partition.

disk

A disk is a physical object used for storing dat a. It will not forget its data when it loses power. It is always used in conjunction with a disk drive. Some disks can be removed from their drives, some cannot. Generally it is possible to write new information to a disk in addition to reading data from it, but this is not always the case.

drive

A device for storing and/or retrieving data. Some drives (such as disk drives, zip drives, and tape drives) are typically cap able of having new data written to them, but some others (like CD-ROMs or DVD-RO Ms) are not. Some drives have random access (like disk drives, zip drives, CD-R OMs, and DVD-ROMs), while others only have sequential access (like tape drives).

e-book

The concept behind an e-book is that it should provide all the functionality of an ordinary book but in a manner that is (overall) less expensive and more environmentally friendly. The actual term e-book is somewhat confusingly used to refer to a variety of things: custom software to play e-book titles, dedicated hardware to play e-book titles, a nd the e-book titles themselves. Individual e-book titles can be free or commercial (but will always be less expensive than their printed counterpar ts) and have to be loaded into a player to be read. Players vary wildly in capability level. Basic ones allow simple reading and bookmarking; better o nes include various features like hypertext, illustrations, audio, and even lim ited video. Other optional features allow the user to mark-up sections of text, leave notes, circle or diagram things, highlight passages, program or custo mize settings, and even use interactive fiction. There are many types of e-book; a couple popular ones include the Newton book and Palm DOC.

e-mail

E-mail is short for electronic mail. It allows f or the transfer of information from one computer to another, provided that they are hooked up via some sort of network (often the Internet. E-mail works similarly to FAXing, but its contents typically get printed out on the other end only on demand, not immediately and automatically as with FAX. A machine receiving e-mail will also not reject other incoming mail messages as a busy FAX machine will; rather they will instead be queued up to be received after the current batch has been completed. E-mail is only seven-bit clean, meani ng that you should not expect anything other than ASCII data to go through uncorrupted without prior conversion via something like uucode or bcode. So me mailers will do some conversion automatically, but unless you know your mai ler is one of them, you may want to do the encoding manually.

file

A file is a unit of (usually named) information stored on a computer.

firmware

Sort of in-between hardware and software, firmwa re consists of modifiable programs embedded in hardware. Firmware updates should be tre ated with care since they can literally destroy the underlying hardare if done improperly. There are also cases where neglecting to apply a firmware update can destroy the underlying hardware, so user beware.

floppy

An extremely common type of removable disk. Flop pies do not hold too much data, but most computers are capable of reading them. Note though that there are different competing format used for floppies, so that a floppy written by one type of computer might not directly work on another. Also sometimes called "diskette".

format

The manner in which data is stored; its organization. For example, VHS, SVHS, and Beta are three different formats of video tape. They are not 100% compatible with each other, but information c an be transferred from one to the other with the proper equipment (but not alw ays without loss; SVHS contains more information than either of the other two). Computer information can be stored in literally hundreds of different forma ts, and can represent text, sounds, graphics, animations, etc. Computer informa tion can be exchanged via different computer types provided both computers can interpret the format used.

function keys

On a computer keyboard, the keys that start with an "F" that are usually (but not always) found on the top row. They are meant to perform user-defined tasks.

graphics

Anything visually displayed on a computer that is not text.

hardware

The physical portion of the computer.

hypertext

A hypertext document is like a text document with the ability to contain pointers to other regions of (possibly other) hypert ext documents.

Internet

The Internet is the world-wide network of comput ers. There is only one Internet, and thus it is typically capitalized (although it is sometimes referred to as "the 'net"). It is different from an intranet.

keyboard

A keyboard on a computer is almost identical to a keyboard on a typewriter. Computer keyboards will typically have extra keys, however. Some of these keys (common examples include Control, Alt, and Meta) are meant to be used in conjunction with othe r keys just like shift on a regular typewriter. Other keys (common examples include Insert, Delete, Home, End, Help, function keys,etc.) are meant to be used independently and often perform editing tasks. Keyboards on different platf orms will often look slightly different and have somewhat different collections of keys. Some keyboards even have independent shift lock and caps lock keys. Smaller keyboards with only math-related keys are typically called "keypads".

language

Computer programs can be written in a variety of different languages. Different languages are optimized for different tasks. Common languages include Java, C, C++, ForTran, Pascal, Lisp, and BASIC. So me people classify languages into two categories, higher-level and lower-level. These people would consider assembly language and machine language lower-le vel languages and all other languages higher-level. In general, higher-level languages can be either interpreted or compiled; many languages allow both, but some are restricted to one or the other. Many people do not consider machine language and assembly language at all when talking about programming languages.

laptop

A laptop is any computer designed to do pretty m uch anything a desktop system can do but run for a short time (usually two to f ive hours) on batteries. They are designed to be carried around but are not particularly convenient to carry around. They are significantly more expens ive than desktop systems and have far worse battery life than PDAs. Calling a system a laptop implies nothing about its platform. By far the fastest lapt ops are the PowerPC based Macintoshes.

memory

Computer memory is used to temporarily store dat a. In reality, computer memory is only capable of remembering sequences of zer os and ones, but by utilizing the binary number system it is possible to produ ce arbitrary rational numbers and through clever formatting all manner of representations of pictures, sounds, and animations. The most common types of memory are RAM, ROM, and flash.

MHz & megahertz

One megahertz is equivalent to 1000 kilohertz, or 1,000,000 hertz. The clock speed of the main processor of many computers is measured in MHz, and is sometimes (quite misleadingly) used to represent the overall speed of a computer. In fact, a computer's speed is based upon many factors, and since MHz only reveals how many clock cycles the main processor has per second (saying nothing about how much is actually accomplished per cycle), it can really only accurately be used to gauge two computers with t he same generation and family of processor plus similar configurations of memo ry, co-processors, and other peripheral hardware.

modem

A modem allows two computers to communicate over ordinary phone lines. It derives its name from modulate / demodulate, the process by which it converts digital computer data back and forth for use w ith an analog phone line.

monitor

The screen for viewing computer information is called a monitor.

mouse

In computer parlance a mouse can be both the physical object moved around to control a pointer on the screen, and the pointer itself. Unlike the animal, the proper plural of computer mouse is "mouses".

multimedia

This originally indicated a capability to work w ith and integrate various types of things including audio, still graphics, and especially video. Now it is more of a marketing term and has little real meaning. Historically the Amiga was the first multimedia machine. Today in addition to AmigaOS, IRIX and Solaris are popular choices for high-end multimedia work.

NC

The term network computer refers to any (usually desktop) computer system that is designed to work as part of a network rath er than as a stand-alone machine. This saves money on hardware, software, and maintenance by taking advantage of facilities already available on the netw ork. The term "Internet appliance" is often used interchangeably with NC.

network

A network (as applied to computers) typically me ans a group of computers working together. It can also refer to the physical wi re etc. connecting the computers.

notebook

A notebook is a small laptop with similar price, performance, and battery life.

organizer

An organizer is a tiny computer used primarily to store names, addresses, phone numbers, and date book information. They usua lly have some ability to exchange information with desktop systems. They boast even better battery life than PDAs but are far less capable. They are extremely inexpensive but are typically incapable of running any special purpose applications and are thus of limited use.

OS

The operating system is the program that manages a computer's resources. Common OSes include Windows '95, MacOS, Linux, Solari s, AmigaOS, AIX, Windows NT, etc.

PC

The term personal computer properly refers to any desktop, laptop, or notebook computer system. Its use is inconsistent, thou gh, and some use it to specifically refer to x86 based systems running MS-DOS, MS-Windows, GEOS, or OS/2. This latter use is similar to what is meant by a WinTel system.

PDA

A personal digital assistant is a small battery-powered computer intended to be carried around by the user rather t han left on a desk. This means that the processor used ought to be power-effici ent as well as fast, and the OS ought to be optimized for hand-held use. PDAs typically have an instant-on feature (they would be useless without it) and most are grayscale rather than color because of battery life issues. Most h ave a pen interface and come with a detachable stylus. None use mouses. All have some ability to exchange data with desktop systems. In terms of raw capabilities, a PDA is more capable than an organizer and less capable than a laptop (although some high-end PDAs beat out some low-end laptops). By far the most popular PDA is the Pilot, but other common types include Newtons, Psions, Zauri, Zoomers, and Wi ndows CE hand-helds. By far the fastest current PDA is the Newton (based around a StrongARM RISC processor). Other PDAs are optimized for other tasks; few computers are as personal as PDAs and care must be taken in their purchase. Feneric's PDA / Handheld Comparison Page is perhaps the most detailed comparison of PDAs and handheld computers to be found anywhere on the web.

platform

Roughly speaking, a platform represents a comput er's family. It is defined by both the processor type on the hardware side and t he OS type on the software side. Computers belonging to different platforms ca nnot typically run each other's programs (unless the programs are written in a language like Java).

portable

If something is portable it can be easily moved from one type of computer to another. The verb "to port" indicates the moving itself.

printer

A printer is a piece of hardware that will print computer information onto paper.

processor

The processor (also called central processing un it, or CPU) is the part of the computer that actually works with the data and r uns the programs. There are two main processor types in common usage today: CISC and RISC. Some computers have more than one processor and are thus called "multiprocessor". This is distinct from multitasking. Advertisers often use megahertz numbers as a means of showing a processor's speed. This is often extremely misleading; megahertz numbers are more or less meaningless when compared across different types of processors.

program

A program is a series of instructions for a computer, telling it what to do or how to behave. The terms "application" and "app" mean almost the same thing (alb eit applications generally have GUIs). It is however different from an applet. Program is also the verb that means to create a program, and a programmer is one who programs.

run

Running a program is how it is made to do someth ing. The term "execute" means the same thing.

software

The non-physical portion of the computer; the pa rt that exists only as data; the programs. Another term meaning much the same is "code".

spreadsheet

An program used to perform various calculations. It is especially popular for financial applications. Some common spreadsheets include Lotus 123, Excel, OpenOffice Spreadsheet, Octave, Gnumeric, AppleWo rks Spreadsheet, Oleo, and GeoCalc.

user

The operator of a computer.

word processor

A program designed to help with the production of textual documents, like letters and memos. Heavier duty work can be done wi th a desktop publisher. Some common word processors include MS-Word, OpenOffice Write, WordPerfect, AbiWord, AppleWorks Write, and GeoWrite.

www

The World-Wide-Web refers more or less to all the publically accessable documents on the Internet. It is used quite loosely, and sometimes indicates only HTML files and sometimes FTP and Gopher files, too . It is also sometimes just referred to as "the web".


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Glossary of Computer Repair and Installation Terms - Rick Olson - Fixit Wizard, glossary of computer terms.Glossary of Computer Repair and Installation Terms - Rick Olson - Fixit Wizard, glossary of computer terms.Glossary of Computer Repair and Installation Terms - Rick Olson - Fixit Wizard, glossary of computer terms.












































Glossary of Computer Repair and Installation Terms - Rick Olson - Fixit Wizard, glossary of computer terms.

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